Dublin Continued: Medieval Ages & the Alleyways of the City

After the bus tour, we cheerfully walked over to the Dublinia. By that time it had started to drizzle. The Dublinia is one of the main attractions (people told us we have to see it, even if we are not interested in museums, as this is simply interesting - they did not lie). And so we went. It is right next to the Christ Church. 

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It is all about Viking and Medieval Ages in Ireland. I know, it’s history but the exhibition (or museum) is very interactive and so trying to imagine what life must have been like ages ago was really fun and, indeed, interesting. I’d really recommend this while in Dublin. It is located right at the crossroad of old and modern Dublin. For students, it’s 7,50 Euros and 8,50 without concession. It is most definitely worth it. Grab an audio guide and go back in time (and afterwards, be happy that you live in the 21st century, but you will be).

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Having almost come to the end of the Medieval times but T. still reading, I was already heading up the stairs to see what else was there to see.

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You have the possibility to climb up the stairs and enjoy a great view from the top. But first of all, you

have

to manage all those steps. It’s not too bad actually ;-).

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We made it to the top

.

Unfortunately, the weather was not too good. But still: the view is quite nice.

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 You exit the Dublinia through the Christ Church.

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It is relatively big and exudes this special mystical atmosphere that always makes me pause for a split second.

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Afterwards, we wandered the alleyways of Dublin and eventually stopped for lunch at a (not so Irish) Tapas Bar. It was a random choice as we were hungry and this looked quite good. (I tend to judge the quality of a restaurant by the number of people present.)

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These alleys make Dublin appear very small and cosy and in fact you can easily reach your destination in the heart of the city within a few minutes time.

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Someone had a creative vein this year. Too bad we didn’t have the chance to actually be there on March 17th. Obviously joking, our bus driver Joe told us before that St. Patrick’s Day is the only day of the year when the Irish drink

officially

.

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Salamanca

was where we then decided to get a bite to eat.

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A quick look. Enough people in there. Decision made.

It turned out to be a good choice! 

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We went for the “Lunch for a Tenner” deal and got a glass of cool white wine with it. What else could you ask for?

T. had the sweet potato fries and the beef burger.

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I went for the Ravioli in some kind of Vodka-cream sauce (what an exotic recipe this must be).

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There is always room for dessert. We gave the warm apple tarte with caramel and vanilla ice-cream a go. I wouldn’t mind eating one right now…

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About an hour later, we were back on track. It was raining and so we went into some of the little shops. Luckily, we didn’t have to wait long until it was dry again - at least for the next half an hour.

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This is when we headed to one of the most exciting activities of the day: the Guinness brewery. At this time I was not too convinced but thought it might be worth a visit. However, I have now completely changed my mind.

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We spent the whole remaining afternoon there as it is simply an adventure ! And I am even saying that as someone who really is

not

into beer.

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Be excited. I’ll tell you more about Dublin’s most loved beer in a little while…